MATH DO

  1. #1 Ten-Digit Drag
  2. Your HEAD is the DECIMAL POINT. It separates WHOLES . PARTS.
  3. Ten Digits - DECImal SYSTEM - BASE-10 - Direction and Order of Numbers
  4. Separate the bills and lay them out, ordered like the chart.
  5. Label 3 x 5 Index Tab Dividers and store your money by denomination in a 3 x 5 card file box.
  6. ONES: Count ten ones into patterns of 5. Write 1, 2, 3....on the chart.
  7. UNI- (one): Make Flashcards for the 17 UNI-words.
  8. UNI- WORDS: Quiz 4 people on the meaning and spelling.
  9. File your UNI- words in your file box.
  10. UNI TEST: Make a math test using 5 of the UNI words. For example: My cousin applied to the top 5 UNIVERSITIES for astrophysics in the country. Draw a picture to illustrate the story: _____
How many college applications did he fill out? 5 Write an equation to represent the story: 5 universities x 1 application for each = 5 applications altogether. 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 = 5 5 x 1 = 5 Model the equation with money: $1 bill x 5 = 5 dollars
  1. Give your UNI TEST to your parents and your siblings. How did they do?
  2. Fold your UNI TEST into quarters and file it under the UNI- TAB in your file box.
  3. TEN: Trade 10 ones for a $10.
  4. Count 10 $10s into patterns of 5. 10 x 10 =100. 5(10) + 5(10) = 50 + 50 = 100.
  5. DECA- TEN: Learn DECA- 10 Words.
  6. DECA WORDS: Make 17 DECA- 10 Flascards.
  7. DECA WORDS: Quiz 4 people on meaning and spelling.
  8. File your 17 DECA- 10 Words in your card box.
  9. DECA TEST: Make a math test using 5 DECA words. For example: We captured 4 decapods (crabs) on the beach and brought them home for dinner. Draw a picture to illustrate the story: _____
How many crab legs will we have to eat? 40 Write an equation to represent the story: 4 decapods (crabs) x 10 legs on each = 40 crab legs altogether. 10 + 10 + 10 + 10 = 40 4 x 10 = 40 Model the equation with money: $10 bill x 4 = 40 dollars
  1. Give your DECA TEST to your parents and your siblings. How did they do?
  2. Fold your DECA TEST into quarters and file it under the DECA- TAB in your file box.
  3. HUNDRED: Trade 10 $10 for $100.
  4. CENT means 100.
  5. CENT WORDS: Make illustrated flascards for 11 CENT words.
  6. CENT WORDS: Quiz 4 people on meaning and spelling.
  7. File your CENT = 100 words in the box.
  8. CENT TEST: Make a math test using 5 CENT words. For example: It has been two centuries since a storm dumped 100 inches of snow in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in just one day!
Draw a picture to illustrate the story: _____How many years has it been since 100 inches of snow fell in SNM? 200Write an equation to represent the story: 2 centuries x 100 years in each = 200 years altogether. 100 + 100 = 200 2 x 100 = 200 Model the equation with money: $100 bill x 2 = 200 dollars
  1. Give your CENT TEST to your parents and your siblings. How did they do?
  2. Fold your CENT TEST into quarters and file it under the CENT- TAB in your file box.
  3. THOUSAND: Count 10 $100 bills into patterns of 5. 100 x 10 = ten hundred = one thousand = $1,000.
  4. MILL- means 1,000.
  5. MILL WORDS: Read, spell, and illustrate MILL WORDS. Make flashcards for these Mill- words that mean 1,000.
  6. MILL WORDS: Quiz 4 people on mill- words.
  7. File the mill flashcards under 1,000 in your index card box.
  8. MILL TEST: Make a math test using 4 of the MILL words. For example: Players of The Sims VR game logged a decamillenium of hours! Draw a picture to illustrate the story: _____
How many hours have been played? 10,000 Write an equation to represent the story: 1 decamillennium = 10 (deca) sets of 1,000 years (millennium) = 10,000 years altogether. 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 = 10,000 10 x 1,000 = 10,000 Model the equation with money: $1,000 bill x 2 = 2 thousand dollars
  1. Give your MILL TEST to your parents and your siblings. How did they do?
  2. Fold your MILL TEST into quarters and file it under the MILL- TAB in your file box.
  3. BIBLICAL FRAGMENTS AND ANCIENT BASKET FOUND IN ISRAEL CAVE
Read the artice. Highlight all of the QUANTITATIVE WORDS (words that tell you an amount of time or age or number of something, a quantity).
A. Identify the number prefixes in the words.B. A __________________________ child skeleton was found. C. It is ____________ years-old.D. Dozen means 12. They unearthed two dozen Dead Sea Scroll fragments. How many pieces of scrolls did they find? _____x_____= ________E. How old is the basket? ___________________________ (include the unit).F. What is another way (a word) to describe the basket's age (see #33 above)? ________________________G. This is the first discovery of scrolls in more than half a century. A half-century is ________ years? Write the equation for CENTURY _______ - ____% = _________ or _______ years (a century) ÷ 2 (halves) = ______ years (1 half-century) = _____ ÷ 2 = ______. H. They last discoverd scrolls in the Judean Desert 60 years ago. How many decades since scrolls were discovered? 60 ÷ ____ = ____. __________ decades. I. When did Jews hide from Roman Emperor Hadrian in a canyon south of Jerusalem? ________ ________________ = ___________ years. J. The scrolls date to the ______________ _______________ AD. K. What does AD mean? ______________ ____________. What is a cenury? ___________________________________ M. What years are in the first century AD? _________________ N. What years are in the second century AD? ______________ O. Jews revolted against the Romans between AD 132 and AD 136. What century AD is this? ______________ Why? __________

COUNT BY 2

  1. TWO: 2
  2. 2 x 10 = 20
  3. Add 2 ten times by counting $2 bills into patters of 5.
  4. Multiply by 2: 2 x 1 = 2; 2 x 2 = 4; 2 x 3 = 6; .....2 x 10 = 20.
  5. Divide by 2 by following these *Images x 2.
  6. Bi- means 2
  7. BI WORDS: Read these BI- WORDS.
  8. Bi- WORDS: Make illustrated flashcards of these BI- words that mean 2.
  9. BI WORDS: Quiz 4 people on meaning and spelling.
  10. BI TEST: Make a math test using 5 of the bi words. Example: Volunteers rode three bicycles to the repair shop. The shopkeeper will put new tubes in all of the tires. Draw a picture to illustrate the story: _____
How wany new tubes will the shopkeeper replace for these riders? 6 Write an equation to represent the story: 3 bikes x 2 wheels on each = 6 tubes altogether. 3 x 2 = 6 Model the equation with money: 3 x $2 bill = 6 dollars
  1. Give your BI TEST to your parents and your siblings. How did they do?
  2. Fold your BI TEST into quarters and file it under the BI- TAB in your file box.

EARTH DAY!

  1. Read these articles, answer the questions, and express the numbers many ways:
Words, Chart in Standard Form, Model with Money, Expanded Form, SI Symbol, Scientific Notation. Always state the unit.
  1. The petrified tree in Virginia's Prince William Park is ____ years old.
  2. The Earth is _________ years old.
  3. The Cretaceous Period lasted for ______ years and ended ______ years ago.
  4. A catastrophe at the end of the Cretaceous Period wiped out _____% of life on Earth.
  5. The petrified tree was _____ years old when it died. It was ________ decades old.
  6. The State of Virginia is _____ years old, which is _______ centuries old. The Commonwealth of Virginia is ____ decades old.
  7. In 2019, mining and well operations in Virginia produced _____ tons of coal, _____ cubic feet of natural gas, and _____ barrels of oil. This energy had an estimated market value of $_______.

FRACTIONS

FRACT means break!

  1. Fract Video

  2. Make flashcards of 7 FRACT words.

  3. FRACT WORDS: Quiz 4 people on meaning & spelling.

  4. $ Coins Fraction Equivalents

  5. Fractions-Split-half-third-fifth.pdf

  6. Fraction-Stack-Dyscalculia.org.pdf

  7. Fractions Workbook - Practice with Coins

  8. TENTHS: $1 10 = 10 dimes. Visuals. Video.

  9. Count 10 dimes into patterns of 5.

  10. Touch each dime as you count saying:

  11. "Ten cents" 10c, 20c, 30c, 40c, 50c...100c.

  12. One-tenth: Count dimes touching and saying: "one-tenth" 1/10, 2/10, 3/10, 4/10,...10/10.

  13. Decimal, 0.10: Count dimes touching and saying: "point 1" .1, .2, .3, .4, .5, ... .9, 1.0.

  14. HUNDREDTHS: Next, BREAK a dime into 10 equal pieces = 10 pennies. A dime is 10 cents. Visuals. Video.

  15. CENTS: But each penny is a cent because cent means 100 and you need 100 pennies to = $1. So each penny is a hundredth of a dollar. 1/100 = 1c = 1 cent = 1 penny.

  16. Count 10 pennies into sets of 5.

  17. Touch and say as you count: "1 cent, 2 cents, ...10 cents."

  18. One-hundredth: Touch and say the fraction form of a penny as you count: "one-hundredth, two-hundredths, three-hundredths, 4/100, 5/100...10/100."

  19. Decimal, 0.01: Touch and say as you count: "point zero one, point zero two, .03, .05... .09, .10."

  20. Percent: Percent means for each (per) 100 (cent), for each 100. Each penny is 1 cent or 1 PER CENT of one dollar.

  21. Count percents: Touch the pennies and say as you count, "one percent, two percent, three percent, 4%, 5%, 6%....10%.

METHODOLOGY

Don't be intimidated by math symbols. Modeling the numbers and relationships is easy with the money and the chart, but once you translate the real to the symbolic expressions on paper, we enter a fuzzy, stressful, abstract mental math area (we increase cognitive load, slow processing, and encounter more errors in speaking and writing). But, we can slow down and see what we've modeled and then carefully translate it into math language and equations. Equations are complete sentences containing digits that represent the ideas, operational symbols represent the action [-, +, ÷ , x] and an = sign. Writing in math language will be clunkier than just using the money and chart alone. Fluency in writing math expressions will come with practice and if the student teaches others how it is done and what the symbols represent.


Again, we start with the concrete and develop fluency in the oral language that describes what we are doing when modeling with bills and coins and discovering relationships with the chart. In human development, we develop speech before the ability to write. After we can fluently discuss ideas and demonstrate them, then we can move to write about them using symbolic math language.


Ultimately, students develop the ability to see the math symbols and associate concrete meaning to them because they have modeled numbers and relationships and have experience translating math symbols into words, and then can combine verbal reasoning and visual reasoning to process quantitative information and solve problems.


When operating at the first stage (verbal and demonstrative), students quickly gain understanding, skill, and confidence.


We anticipate more difficulty when transitioning to the written stage. Just anticipate brain glitches, and just make sure to allow students to restate or rewrite until both words and symbols match the ideas they want to express. Accuracy and ability to integrate doing, describing, and writing in math language, will improve with practice and the student's teaching the process to others.